How climate change caused the world’s first ever empire to collapse

How climate change caused the world’s first ever empire to collapse by Vasile Ersek, Northumbria University, Newcastle is another story of scientists saying yet again that in the past, shifts in climate impacted one way or another  life on earth. The picture above is that of the author while researching data from a cave in […]

Palestinian architect Nadia Habash discusses

Rima Al Sammarae wrote on November 4th, 2018 about how life carries on in the Palestinian territories, notably for a certain Nadia Habash, co-owner and director of Habash Consulting Engineers and adjunct lecturer at Birzeit University.  Here is, courtesy to Middle East Architect how: Palestinian architect Nadia Habash discusses working with Peter Zumthor and persevering […]

Five ways ancient India changed the world – with maths

It should come as no surprise that the first recorded use of the number zero, recently discovered to be made as early as the 3rd or 4th century, happened in India. Mathematics on the Indian subcontinent has a rich history going back over 3,000 years and thrived for centuries before similar advances were made in Europe, with its influence meanwhile spreading to China and the Middle East.
As well as giving us the concept of zero, Indian mathematicians made seminal contributions to the study of trigonometry, algebra, arithmetic and negative numbers among other areas. Perhaps most significantly, the decimal system that we still employ worldwide today was first seen in India.

Today’s Iraq eager to get back its antiquities

Per the US Library of Congress, the world’s first civilizations grew up in the fertile valley between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, the region of the Middle East long known as Mesopotamia (from the Greek meaning ‘between two rivers’), that roughly corresponds to the territory of present-day Iraq. These ancient civilizations included Sumer, the Babylonian Empire, and the Assyrian Empire. This modern map produced by the Directorate General of Antiquities of Iraq shows the locations of archaeological sites and rock monuments in the country. The table at the lower left lists chronological periods from the Paleolithic to the Islamic. The table at the upper right lists ancient place names such as Ashur, Babylon, and Nineveh, and their equivalents in modern Arabic. Today’s Iraq eager to get back its antiquities is covered by this proposed article of AlMonitor written by Adnan Abu Zeed with translation by Sahar Ghoussoub was published on August 3, 2017. It shows that the Middle East upheavals have amongst many other things consequences that are at best of times unpredictable. These normally include all sorts of rights but also duties such as those described here.

Greater Cairo Region (GCR) many Challenges

Of all the MENA countries capital cities, the Greater Cairo Region (GCR) with a present population well over the 20 million mark is a vast agglomeration with many challenges. It is a place of unique political and cultural significance for the world. It has always and still is the prime engine of economic growth and the main population centre in Egypt. The newly settled leadership facing enormous challenges has wisely decided to involve two of the many influencing factors of the country, i.e. its youth and transportation.
Prior to diving the thick of the subject, and as highlighted in an article of the UN HABITAT, Cairo lives with many key challenges; most importantly planning, infrastructure and service delivery which has been managed to barely keep up with the very rapid urban growth over the past four decades, we would like to propose in this context, this article of Centre for Mediterranean Integration of Marseille, France, titled:

Promoting Public Private Partnership “PPP” to Include Transportation Start-ups in Greater Cairo

Transportation has direct impact on the economy, the environment and people’s mobility. On one hand, the air quality is getting worse and there is pollution due to vehicle emissions resulted from the increasing fuel consumption. On the other hand, the large number of people working in places far away from their residence directly affect traffic negatively.

Great Giza Pyramid’s Construction Details

The 4,500 years old papyrus has just been displayed in public in Cairo Museum as reported by the International Business Times on July 21, 2016 in an article written by Léa Surugue. it is about the Great Giza Pyramid’s Construction Details.

Oldest papyrus ever found reveals details of Great Giza pyramid’s construction

Ancient documents described as the oldest papyruses in existence have been put on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The 4,500-year-old documents, unveiled at the museum last Friday (15 July 2016), appear to detail the steps of the Great Pyramid of Giza’s construction as well as the daily lives of workers.

The pyramid is believed to have been completed between 2560 and 2540 BC under Pharaoh Khufu’s reign – during the Fourth Dynasty of Egypt. Some scholars believe the King’s Chamber at the heart of the pyramid contains his royal remains, but this has not yet been proven.