Africa Diabetes retailing Medtronic insulin pump in Morocco

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Capitalising on its technological expertise in the field of E-health and Diabetes, Africa Diabetes retailing Medtronic insulin pump in Morocco started a well publicised marketing operation; it is about an insulin pump and a wide range of innovative accompanying solutions for all health professionals in Morocco.

Details as provided by Zineb Nafii of Jankari Consulting follow below.

The MENA region

Innovation: Africa Diabetes, a company specializing in innovative supply to diabetes, starts marketing off the catalogue of the American leader Medtronic insulin pump.

Goal: To allow Insulin-dependent diabetics to monitor 24/7 their blood sugar and be able to protect themselves from the hypos.

In practice, two ranges of pumps are available in Morocco. It’s the last pump generation “MiniMed 640 G” and the pump “MiniMed Paradigm Veo”. The offer covers, in addition to the supply of these two insulin pumps, an accompaniment of potential pump holders in consumables to monitor on the day to day their blood sugar (catheters, quick-set infusion set, silhouette infusion set, safe-T infusion set, tanks of insulin and Enlite Sensor).

The deployment of this innovative technology by Africa Diabetes, which requires a closer follow-up of a patient by a health care professional, including endocrinologists, relies on the expertise of two strategic partners, in this case, Eramedic and teams of Medtronic in the Middle East and North Africa region.

At the same time, Africa Diabetes makes available to the type 1 diabetics, children and adults, sensitive to pain of injections of insulin or who suffer from anxiety related to injections, the I-port Advance technology. It is a solution to use with a syringe or an insulin Pen for several injections a day without repeated bites, for a maximum of three days (72 hours).

In another line, Africa Diabetes makes accessible, the “IPro2” solution from Medtronic for the measurement of glucose for professional use by ecosystem health (endocrinologists, diabetologists, clinical, and University Hospitals).

In addition to the advanced offer on the insulin pump supply, Africa Diabetes has, through its platform e-Commerce www.africa-diabetes.com of a catalogue of 100 products that cover the daily needs of type 1 and 2 diabetes such as test strips to measure blood sugar and urinary, needles, injection, insulated kits pens, books, diabetic foot, nutrition… Patients can order and pay online through the interbank electronic payment Center (IJC) platform.

In terms of logistics, Africa Diabetes delivers its products through Morocco using Aramex services that allow users to track their orders online.

 

 

 

We need a New Narrative for Globalization of Klaus Schwab

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Looking for some good weekend reads, we could not let the following article We need a New Narrative for Globalization of Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman, World Economic Forum go unnoticed. As a Regular Author, Klaus Schwab produced many noteworthy contributions in various media on this very subject, and we could not let it pass without hopefully helping its spread throughout the MENA region.  Globalisation is as a matter of fact impacting the MENA Region which with its diverse countries socio-economic and political arrangements does contribute to the ever increasing expansion globalisation but in its own discrete ways, resulting in as diverse appreciation and / or revulsion as elsewhere by its populations.

The only sure thing about this phenomenon is that it (globalisation) is here to stay and that it has only one way to go: expand further.  As put by this author: ‘We have to manage our future based on the fact that we are simultaneously local, national and global citizens with overlapping responsibilities and identities.’  And that: ‘The promise of a better future lies in acting together as stakeholders of a technology-driven global transformation process, with the objective of building a more modern, inclusive and human world.’ 

Klaus Schwab: We need a new narrative for globalization

Published by the WEF on Friday 17 March 2017

The world is at a historic crossroads. Market extremism, often labelled neoliberalism, which has shaped our national and global policies for the past three decades, has become a toxic fuel for the stuttering engine for global growth. It has also generated polluting side effects that are no longer tolerated by large portions of society.

Yet market-driven globalization has lifted over a billion people out of poverty and has been an overall driver of improved standards of living. In its present form, however, it is no longer fit for purpose in our current – nor particularly our future – context.

What are the reasons?

First, the global economic system has moved from focusing on meeting the needs and aspirations of crucial segments of society who feel they are living in a precarious situation, to focusing on the optimization of the system itself. As such, individuals want to regain control of their livelihoods and seek out more than material satisfaction. People are searching for meaning and purpose in their lives – lives that are not solely defined by economics and business, but which also encompass social and cultural affinities. Many people feel spiritually isolated in a globalized world and long for a socio-economic context in which greater emphasis is placed again on shared values and less on impersonal rules.

In addition, the legitimacy of a purely market-driven global economy was undermined by a growing number of systemic challenges, such as:

  • The transition from a unipolar to a multipolar world, and consequently, to a world with competing societal concepts which challenge “Western” thinking;
  • Market power, corrupt practices and speculative financial practices distorting the fairness of markets and the process of real long-term value creation;
  • Transformation of production processes, emphasizing automation, capital and innovation over manual, and soon intellectual, labour;
  • The serious threat to the preservation and regeneration of our environment, caused by the excessive use and erosion of our natural resources.

Unheeded warnings

Since the 1980s, I have drawn attention repeatedly to the deficiencies of neoliberal globalization. For example, in an editorial for the International Herald Tribune (now the New York Times) more than 20 years ago, I wrote:

“Economic globalization has entered a critical phase. A mounting backlash against its effects, especially in the industrial democracies, is threatening a very disruptive impact on economic activity and social stability in many countries … This can easily turn into revolt …”

Even though the World Economic Forum emphasized the importance of social responsibility in its programmes in Davos and around the world, these warnings were not taken seriously enough.

Today, we face a backlash against that system and the elites who are considered to be its unilateral beneficiaries. The danger of this backlash is that it overlooks the fact that the search for innovation and competitiveness is still the main driver of economic development, and ultimately social progress. It is not the market-based system itself that is the issue, but rather its implementation. It is the lack of adequate and trustworthy principles to maintain a social contract inside it, which is indispensable to a fair, prosperous and healthy society.

Moreover, the tendency to resurrect national borders and other obstacles to global interconnectivity overlooks the fact that the world has become a community of shared responsibility. Global cooperation cannot be undone without causing major damage to all involved. We depend on each other when confronting the challenges of pollution, migration, space exploration, terrorism and crime – to name but a few.

It is also true that some of the elites were at the origin of aberrations in the system, just as others triggered a popular outcry over excessive abuses of this power. But any society that wants to remain dynamic needs people who assume responsibility for political and economic successes and failures alike. In a fast-changing world, where our very notion of identity is being challenged, the ideological choice is no longer between left and right, but rather between open and closed – with one of the consequences being that people are increasingly opposing “cosmopolitan” elites.

Thus, the ideological battle currently raging should not be between defending the “old” system against the current forces offering simple answers to very complex sets of challenges. Instead, this impasse must urgently be overcome – to not only be responsive to the grievances and anger of large portions of society, but also to move forward. Failure to do so will only result in a further shift towards more polarized societies and a breakdown of the norms that are fundamental to social cohesion.

The future challenge: the Fourth Industrial Revolution

There is no new replacement or ready-made ideology that can be conveniently taken “off the shelf”. Our priority should instead be to redesign our economic and social systems, taking into consideration that humankind, thanks to global interconnectivity and the growing impact of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, is becoming more sophisticated, and the individual more emancipated.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution will completely alter how we produce, how we consume, how we communicate and how we live. It will redefine the relationship between citizens and the state. It will provide us with great opportunities for enhancing the lives of individuals and societies. It will allow, if we get it right, a much more human-centred approach, fostering not only material satisfaction, but also genuine individual and societal well-being for all.

The present focus of our economic and political discussions seems to completely miss the mark. We have now a historic window of opportunity to shape technological breakthroughs, such as artificial intelligence and gene editing, in the service and for the benefit of humankind. We have two options. We can either fully use the opportunities of the Fourth Industrial Revolution to help lift humanity to new heights, or we can allow ourselves to be controlled by the forces of technology and end up in a dystopian world in which citizens will have lost their autonomy.

Mastering the Fourth Industrial Revolution is a global challenge. The tension between globalism and nationalism is artificial. We have to manage our future based on the fact that we are simultaneously local, national and global citizens with overlapping responsibilities and identities. The best way to develop a sustainable future is through the stakeholder concept, which I developed more than 40 years ago, and which forms the base of the Forum’s philosophy.

The basic principle for the success of the stakeholder concept is to find long-term solutions based on dialogue, and endorsed by the commitment and willingness to achieve the best outcome in the shared long-term interest of all stakeholders. As the international organization for public-private cooperation, the World Economic Forum is committed to serving this purpose as a catalyst and convener.

The promise of a better future lies in acting together as stakeholders of a technology-driven global transformation process, with the objective of building a more modern, inclusive and human world.

 

 

Get ready for a new economic order by 2030 / 2050

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As put by Bloomberg in an article by Jeanna Smialek dated April 10, 2015 where she said: ” Get ready for a new economic order by 2030 / 2050. In the world 15 years from now, the U.S. will be far less dominant, several emerging markets will catapult into prominence, and some of the largest European economies will be slipping behind.”

A new economic order by 2030 / 2050 ?

Last week an article on the same subject and written by Lianna Brinded, Markets Editor, Business Insider and published in collaboration with Business Insider on Thursday 9 February 2017 by the WEF goes like below.

 

A prediction: the world’s most powerful economies in 2030

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), one of the world’s largest professional-services firms, just released its predictions for the most powerful economies in the world by 2030.

The report, titled “The long view: how will the global economic order change by 2050?” ranked 32 countries by their projected global gross domestic product by purchasing power parity (PPP).

PPP is used by macroeconomists to determine the economic productivity and standards of living among countries across a certain time period.

While PwC’s findings show some of the same countries right near the top of the list in 13 years, they also have numerous economies slipping or rising massively by 2030 [ . . . ]

The PwC Report Key findings

This report sets out our latest long-term global growth projections to 2050 for 32 of the largest economies in the world, accounting for around 85% of world GDP.

Key results of our analysis (as summarised also in the accompanying video) include:

  • The world economy could more than double in size by 2050, far outstripping population growth, due to continued technology-driven productivity improvements
  • Emerging markets (E7) could grow around twice as fast as advanced economies (G7) on average
  • As a result, six of the seven largest economies in the world are projected to be emerging economies in 2050 led by China (1st), India (2nd) and Indonesia (4th)
  • The US could be down to third place in the global GDP rankings while the EU27’s share of world GDP could fall below 10% by 2050
  • UK could be down to 10th place by 2050, France out of the top 10 and Italy out of the top 20 as they are overtaken by faster growing emerging economies like Mexico, Turkey and Vietnam respectively
  • But emerging economies need to enhance their institutions and their infrastructure significantly if they are to realise their long-term growth potential.

Explore the World in 2050

View the infographics below for highlights of our GDP projections and explore the results further using our interactive data tool.

Further details are provided in our summary reportfull report and slide pack.

 

Tweet this: PwC #World2050 report projects China and India to be the two largest economies in the world by 2050

Key projections

 

Challenges for policymakers

Our analysis also identifies a number of key challenges for policy-makers, including:

  • Avoid a slide back into protectionism, which history suggests would be bad for global growth in the long run
  • Ensuring that the potential benefits of globalisation are shared more equally across society
  • Developing new green technologies to ensure that long-term global growth is environmentally sustainable

Please download our full report for more in-depth analysis of these policy issues.

Opportunities for business – winning in emerging markets

Our report, which can be downloaded in full below, also considers the opportunities for business:

  • As emerging markets mature, they will become less attractive as low cost manufacturing bases but more attractive as consumer and business-to-business (B2B) markets
  • But international companies need strategies that are flexible enough to adapt to local customer preferences and rapidly evolving local market dynamics
  • Since emerging markets can be volatile, international investors also need to be patient enough to ride out the short-term economic and political cycles in these countries

Please also take a look at the research of our Growth Markets Centre for detailed examples of how companies can succeed in emerging markets.

 

‘Road Rage’ these days in the UK a frequent topic in the newspapers

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‘Road Rage’ these days in the UK a frequent topic in the newspapers means driving here is stressful and involves very high level of concentration because of the state of the roads and the volume of traffic.  You combine that with the fast-paced time orientated working life of most people and you have a toxic, boiling mix of anxiety and frustrating that spills over in the uncontrolled environment on the roads.

Pedal Power to the rescue ?

 

There is one particular flashpoint of anger and that involves other road users such as motorcycles and bikes.  There vehicles have the ability to weave (dangerously) in and out of traffic to avoid queues.  In addition, cyclists have their own lanes in some places and this is a cause of some resentment because those lanes normally amount to white lines drawn on the road that effectually narrow a road that once was wide and easy to negotiate by car.  Cyclists in turn are frustrated that cars often park in these lanes, wide lorries use them and they disappear when the road narrows because the road is too narrow to sustain a cycle path and another road!

Mortality rate for cycling is similar to Sweden’s which appears on the face of it to make the UK safer than even the Netherlands which prosecutes drivers for any fatality involving a cyclist regardless of fault.  The truth, however, is that although the death rate per car is low, it does not represent the number of journeys by bicycle that are actually taken or the location of them.  Many towns like my own are particularly dangerous for cyclists, having hills, narrow roads, and fast, condescended traffic.  Use of bicycles is much lower than in my grandparent’s day and shrinking in everyday even if we produce Olympic stars like Bradley Wiggins.  As a leisure activity cycling is thriving (perhaps because weekend cycling is quieter) but most less fit, shoppers like myself stay off road most of the time.

Other problems for myself include the restriction in the number of bikes allowed on trains, you cannot plan a trip out the country or town by bicycle and get to the station to find no space in the racks on the train.  In the past, the different arrangement of trains allowed for a good many more bikes in the old fashioned Guard’s carriage.  The same carriage also gave space for wheelchairs or pushchairs that are now much more restricted.  Trains, have thus, become limited in use.  Security is another problem.  Once secure parking could be rent off road in towns and now parking is independent and out on the road.  However, one hopeful sign is that there are many more cycle racks to park in than twenty years ago.

Early cycling !

It would be nice, however, to once again ride free and easy, with a nice picnic, out to a country or town station for a pedal about.

I would invite everyone peruse through the following site.

 

 

further reading is on the Guardian .

Consumer Confidence & Spending Intentions

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UAE consumers upbeat about economic outlook . . .

A recent global survey of Consumer Confidence & Spending Intentions was undertaken by a leading performance management company Nielsen .   It shows that global consumer confidence remained stable in the first quarter however below the baseline score of 100, edging up one index point to 98 from last year’s 97.

The Nielsen consumer confidence index measures perceptions of local job prospects, personal finances and immediate spending intentions.

For purposes of this latest report, it surveyed through the polling of more than 30,000 online consumers in 63 countries, and showed that Global Consumer Confidence remained unabated by the downturn of the current global economy.

So much so that, in the world’s largest economy, the US consumer confidence score of 110 remained at or above the optimism baseline for nine consecutive quarters.

In Europe, confidence declined four points in the UK (97) and one point in Germany (97) from the previous quarter, as the outlook for jobs in the next 12 months worsened in both countries.  In France however, confidence declined 10 points to 64, and in Italy, two points to 59.

India remained the most bullish country in the world for the fourth consecutive quarter, with an index score of 134. India scored 134 was followed by consumers in the Philippines with 119 and Indonesia with 117.   Vietnam with 109 is another success story amongst emerging markets in the region, as consistently high consumer confidence scores continued to edge up by two and one percentage, respectively, in the first quarter.

In China, that which in 1966, its Communist leader at the time, Mao Zedong launched what became known as the Cultural Revolution.  The declared objective was to reassert his (Mao’s) authority over the Chinese leadership that started to lean towards too much consumerism as it was considered reactionary and anti-revolutionary.   Things have moved on since then and despite all that, today consumer confidence edged down two points to 105.  Confidence also declined 11 points in Hong Kong (88) and six points in Japan (73).

In Brazil, consumer confidence declined two points in the first quarter to the country’s lowest score (74) in Nielsen’s 11-year consumer-confidence history.   Confidence also fell sharply in Argentina (75) and Colombia (83), declining 13 points and 11 points, respectively, from the previous quarter.

Confidence also declined seven points in South Africa to 75 – a new low for the country in Nielsen’s 11-year consumer-confidence history.

In the MENA region, the optimism level in Saudi Arabia declined two points to match that of the UAE’s score.   According to the Nielsen report, a positive perception of their finances helped UAE resident consumers remain amongst the most optimistic in the world with an above-the-baseline score of 104 that compares favourably with a global average of 98 points.

It notably shows that consumer confidence in the GCC and more specifically in the UAE, “an optimistic, above-the-baseline score of 104” was prevalent in the first three months of 2016.   This figure was however, four points below that of the preceding quarter.  This drop was immediately attributed to the decline in oil prices and the ensuing atmosphere that is taking a toll on consumer sentiments in the UAE.

The survey showed however that the country’s consumer confidence score, is nevertheless amongst the top ten globally and that the UAE’s residents are still upbeat about its economic outlook.  Interestingly, confidence in neighbouring Saudi Arabia reported a consumer confidence decline of two points, bringing it level with the UAE score.

In the meantime, Dubai set to build the largest Expo site ever at Jebel Ali Dubai World Central (DWC) as hosting the Dubai Expo in 2020, is plodding on towards the date of that mega event.   Construction of buildings and infrastructure are on-going.  Read more on all related activities at http://expo2020dubai.ae/